Dylan Brams’ unique photographs of handblown glass

Beacon Gallery is pleased to soon feature the work of Jerusalem-based glass artist Dylan Brams, both online as one of our gallery artists and in our November 2019 show, entitled “Depth”. 

His most recent series, “The Ampolina Project,” merges decorative art history with modern computer programming (doubling as a computer engineer, Brams describes himself as “an engineer with a glass habit.”) For this series, Brams begins by photographing the ampolinas he has made, then applies a proprietary computer program to create a digital-composite image of a series of the vessels. The emergent photograph is an improbable and diaphanous image of glass art. 

A large print of Dylan Brams’ work from Beacon Gallery’s Analog | Digital show in 2019

You may find yourself asking, what exactly is an ampolina? What is it used for? How is it made? 

As stated on the website, the “ampolina” is a Venetian take on the amphora, a jar with two handles, only slightly smaller and with a spout. Brams tells me they were often used as olive oil pitchers. He sculpts each piece of the vessel with molten glass: the body, pitcher, foot, handle, spout, and decorative elements. Collaborating with various partners over 15 years, Brams has created over 330 different ampolinas!

In addition to Brams’ recent lecture on the Ampolina glass form at Hebrew University, the Corning Museum Rakow Research Library’s website offers some valuable insight into the vessel’s history and making process.

Be sure to watch the Corning Museum’s positively mesmerizing video of ampolina glassblowing to fully grasp the skill and precision required to create Brams’ beautifully ornate glass art.

In addition, the prestigious Corning Museum of Glass (Corning, NY) is currently showing Dylan Brams’ work in a competitive 9-month long group exhibition entitled New Glass Now which showcases experimentation and innovation in contemporary glass art.

New Glass Now documents the innovation and dexterity of artists, designers, and architects around the world working in the challenging material of glass. A global survey designed to show the breadth and depth of contemporary glassmaking, the exhibition features objects, installations, videos, and performances made in the last three years by 100 artists of 32 nationalities working in more than 25 countries.

– Corning Museum of Glass

Given that there were submissions by over 1,400 artists from 52 countries, it is truly an honor that Brams’ work was accepted into this selective show. Clearly, his unique style of work and artistic vision take his glasswork and photography beyond traditional “craft” and into the realm of innovative artistry.

Check out the blog again soon for more information on artists being featured this fall!

And Dylan’s work will be online for purchase soon – in multiple sizes. Email contact@beacongallery.com for more info!